13 steps to teach the short story

1- Introduce the title and the author. 

2- Introduce the characters and the names of places.

3- Point out the glossary and how it is organized & how to use it.

4- Assign pages for quick, silent reading at home.

5- Start the reading lesson by asking pupils to look at pictures in these pages & asking some warm up questions.

6- Present the meanings of the key words in these pages.

7- Put one or more Pre-question for each page.

8- Ask pupils to read without knowing every word to answer the pre-question.  

9- Discuss the answers with pupils

10- Put more questions about details & ask pupils to read again to answer

11- Discuss the answers

12- Ask pupils about what they expect may happen next.

13- Give three questions to be answered at home to encourage pupils to read the next assigned part. 

About Questions

1- Tackle the same types and number included in the specifications of the exam.

2- Ask most questions orally; write only 2 or 3 on the board of the most importance.

3- Give 3 questions to be answered at home on what have been read and on the next assigned part of reading.

Eight Things You Should Do to Improve Your ELT

1- Asses your students’ prior knowledge and skills:

Sometimes students know more than we think they do. Sometimes they have misconceptions about the content. The only way to know what information that students bring to a course is to test them to collect information that reveals their current levels of knowledge and understanding. That information is very important to precise the information of the subject matter being studied you should focus on and the suitable methods of TESL you should use.

2- Don’t assume that students know how to learn:

Students must have an idea about appropriate learning strategies and made aware of the strategies that they use. It’s your job to help them know that.

3- Discover and address attitudes and emotions that hinder learning:

Teachers must acknowledge that learning, motivation and engagement are affected by attitudes and emotions. What students believe about themselves and about the subject matter being studied affect their motivation and performance. If teachers ignore the role of attitudes and emotions, that will affect learning outcomes.

4- Design your lessons in the way that connect to your students’ personal and academic goals:

That will enhance motivation and engagement. Students need to see how what they are being asked to learn is relevant to their goals and future plans. Knowing what students care about makes it possible to plan lessons that connect with students and engage them in learning.

5- Examine your students’ views about education and considering how those views influence their learning experiences:

Students come to school with different beliefs about knowledge and have different expectations of their teachers. Students are diverse. They have different cultural backgrounds. Again, knowing what students believe and expect makes it easier to plan meaningful learning experiences.

6- Treat students as apprentices who need assistance in learning the language, ways of thinking and inquiry methods:

Students need to be taught and must be given the opportunity to make connections between the course content and their own experiences.

7- Challenge students:

You need to do that to apply, integrate, evaluate and construct knowledge. You can do that by engaging students in complex problem-solving activities. Students should not only be knowledge consumer but also be knowledge producer.

8- Learn about learning:

Discuss with your colleagues the best ways of students’ learning and how knowledge about students’ learning can be used in lesson planning.

Eight Activities for the First Day of School

If you are looking for some fun activities for the opening days of school – activities that help you get to know your students and to help them get to know you, check out the following suggestions.

1- True or False?

Write four facts about yourself on the board. Three of them are true, and one is false. Ask students some questions to see what they thought about each statement. That gives you chance to tell a little about yourself. Then, on a sheet of paper, students write three interesting facts about themselves that are true and one that is false. Ask them one by one to read the facts, and ask students what they think about each statement. That gives a chance for students to know more information about each other.

2- Already a Test!

After students sit and you take roll, ask them to take out a sheet of paper and a pen or pencil for their first test of the school year. Ask them to title the test ” My English Teacher ” and ask them to answer all questions which you write on the board. The questions might include:

Where was I born? Am I married or single? How many sons or/and daughters do I have? How old am I? What is my favourite colour? ….. etc. The test can be as long or short as you wish. Make the questions fit the things you would want them to know. At the end of the test, give the right answers. One of the favourite things in this activity is to see a student or more who were in your class the previous year. They always think they will get a full mark in this test, it is your job to let them not to do so.

3- Going in a circle:

Arrange all the desks in a large circle, with everyone facing the center. This makes it easy for the students to talk and get to know one another. Then ask each student to introduce himself/herself. The students must also provide one fact about themselves. Then ask some questions to encourage students to repeat some information about their classmates.

4- Jump into science:

Invite students to scan the table of contents, which introduces major areas covered in the course. Then start with the first unit asking students to read its title. Ask some questions about it to recognize what students know about the topic or issue, what facts or information they would like to know about it. Discuss, in what ways the topic is relevant to their life. If time allows, do the same with unit two, three, …. etc.

5- Ten questions:

Choose an item in the room, and students have to guess what it is. They can ask only ten questions that you can answer with “Yes” or “No”. The student who finally can guess the item will be the next to choose another item.

6- Who Am I?

Give some students flash cards to write four or five statements about themselves, the last line in each statement is a question: who am I? Put the flash cards on the board and have students guess who each person is.

7- Math about me:

Ask students to write some information about themselves in a sheet of paper but this information must be in numbers, e.g. number of people in the family, number of pets, phone number, ….. etc.

Then, students share their numbers with one another. They see what numbers they have in common with their classmates.

8- Last summer holiday:

Write some activities on some cards, e.g. learned how to swim, read some books, watched some English movies, bought a pet, …..etc. Then asking students who did each activity. Have students repeat the sentence and ask some questions to collect more information about each activity, e.g. what movies did you watch? Where did you learn to swim? ….. etc. This is a great way to learn special things about your students and encourage them to use the past simple tense focusing on the irregular past form.

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