Category: Teach Reading

Three Methods to Teach Your Child to Read

Reading is Best Taught Using a Combination of Three Methods:

  1. Auditory training – training for the ears to prepare the child’s brain for phonics.
  2. Phonics – knowledge of letter(s) sounds.
  3. Whole Language – immediate application of phonics into connected sentences and stories.

It’s clear from research that using one of these methods will help only a few children. In fact, using two out of three methods will still leave numerous children illiterate. However, when auditory training, phonics and whole language are merged, literacy rates increase significantly.

Learning How to Read Begins in Children’s Ears.

Most people think children learn how to read through their eyes. But reading is actually learned through the ears. Parents lay a foundation for success in reading by talking to a child, reading books to him, and playing auditory games such as rhyming. The more books you read, the bigger his vocabulary becomes. A bigger vocabulary allows him to recognize lots of words while he reads.

Steps to Teach Your Child to Read:

  1. Teaching alphabet sounds to help your child improve auditory skills.
  2. Encourage and motivate your child to put sounds together.
  3. Teach your child how to rhyme.
  4. Teach your child to sound out new words.
  5. Encourage your child to memorize words as whole units.

The Normal Sequence For Children Learning How to Read:

  1. From birth to age three, children listen to lots of words spoken and learn how to talk.
  2. Children, aged three to four years old have growing vocabularies, and they learn how to rhyme.
  3. In first grade children are taught how to blend letter sounds together to “sound out” words and memorize sight words. They begin reading simple sentences.
  4. Second and third graders learn how to read “chapter” books and read fluently with comprehension.

Students who fail at reading in English are unlikely to do well in English exams at school, so all ESL/EFL teachers in primary schools place much emphasis on developing the reading skills of their learners.

ESL/EFL teachers in primary schools are constantly searching for effective techniques that can help them produce effective results related to getting their students to read in English as quickly as possible, that’s why I’ve decided to create a practical guide with sample activities to help both teachers and parents to teach children beginning reading so that they can read in English easily and quickly.

“Teaching Beginning Reading” eBook tackles the following main ideas:

  • What is reading?
  • The main approaches to teaching beginning reading.
  • The stages of teaching beginning reading.
  • Sample activities for beginning reading.
  • Some important guidelines for EFL teachers to follow before beginning to teach reading in English.

I wrote this eBook to exchange my experience with the teachers on the techniques they should use in the classroom, the guidelines they should follow and the reading tasks that can get most children to read in ESL/EFL classes with ease and in a fairly short time.

To spread benefit, I offer this eBook for the lowest price and moreover, if you buy it, you will get another eBook on “Teaching Grammar in the Classroom to ESL/EFL Learners” as a bonus from elttguide.com.

“Teaching Beginning Reading to ESL/EFL Learners” Now on Sale!

Students who fail at reading in English are unlikely to do well in English exams at school, so all ESL/EFL teachers in primary schools place much emphasis on developing the reading skills of their learners.

ESL/EFL teachers in primary schools are constantly searching for effective techniques that can help them produce effective results related to getting their students to read in English as quickly as possible, that’s why I’ve decided to create this eBook.

It is a practical guide for ESL/EFL teachers to teaching beginning reading and getting their students to read in English easily and quickly.

The eBook tackles the following main ideas:

  • What is reading?
  • The main approaches to teaching beginning reading.
  • The stages of teaching beginning reading.
  • Sample activities for beginning reading.
  • Some important guidelines for EFL teachers to follow before beginning to teach reading in English.

This eBook is Now on SALE for the Lowest Price for a Limited Time. 

I offer this step-by-step eBook guide not only for ESL/EFL teachers but also for parents to help them get their children to read in English easily and in a short time.

Moreover, if you buy this eBook, you will get another eBook on “Teaching Grammar in the Classroom to ESL/EFL Learners as a bonus from elttguide.com.

By selling this eBook, you will not only learn how to teach beginning reading to your students in the classroom but also you will support me with little money to continue my mission of helping ESL/EFL teachers teach English language more effectively.

With my love and appreciation
Mohamed Ramadan
Author & Teacher Trainer

P.S. If you liked this post, please share it with your friends using the buttons below, and if we are not connected on social media yet, you can find me on Facebook and Twitter.

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Factors Hindering Reading Comprehension

There are a number of reasons that cause reading comprehension to fail. Students should be aware of these reasons and then identify the solutions for them applying the appropriate reading strategies that can cause success to reading comprehension. The following are the main factors that hinder reading comprehension:

  • Limited perceptual span.
  • Faulty eye movement.
  • Faulty attention and concentration habits.
  • Lack of practice.
  • Lack of interest.
  • Poor evaluation of important and less important parts.
  • Reasonable wholesome remembering rather than selective remembering.

In addition, there are some hindering factors related to the readers’ habits and others are text related.  Go to the Printables library  and read the printable that shows these factors and how to deal with them to gain positive results in reading comprehension tasks.


Reminder: Printables library is password protected.  If you are one of my blog followers, you have already got the password to access my printables library for FREE. If you are not, and want to read my printables for FREE, Join my email list to receive the password to the library. I update my printables’ library regularly with new, focused and effective ELT printables.

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Moreover, If you are interested in how to teach reading comprehension and want practical tips to do so in the classroom, you can buy my latest eBook: Teaching Reading Comprehension to ESL/EFL Learners: A Practical Classroom Guide With Sample Reading Lesson Plans. Although it costs little but it includes much benefit especially for ESL/EFL teachers who search for practical steps that engage their students in reading and produce positive results. The main ideas tackled in this eBook are:

* The nature of reading comprehension.

* What should be done before starting a reading lesson.

* Reading comprehension strategies and activities.

* How to work with a reading text.

* How to plan a reading lesson (with a model reading lesson plan).

* How to develop your students’ reading comprehension so as to be efficient & advanced.

By selling this eBook, you will not only have control on teaching reading comprehension in the classroom but also you will support me with little money to continue my mission of helping ESL/EFL teachers teach English language more effectively.

Buy This eBook


In addition, You can also get my eBook “Teaching Beginning Reading to ESL/EFL Learners” now for the lowest price for a limited time.

I’ve decided to write this eBook to exchange my experience with the teachers on the techniques they should use in the classroom, the guidelines they should follow and the reading tasks that can get most students to read in ESL/EFL classes with ease and in a fairly short time.

 

 

The main ideas tackled in this eBook are:

* What reading is.

* Approaches to teaching beginning reading.

* Stages of teaching beginning reading.

* Sample activities for beginning reading.

* Guideline before beginning to teach reading in ESL/EFL.

By selling this eBook, you will not only learn how to teach beginning reading to your students in the classroom but also you will support me with little money to continue my mission of helping ESL/EFL teachers teach English language more effectively.

Buy This eBook


You can also subscribe to my blog not only to get our latest posts delivered to your email box but also to get our FREE GIFT“How to teach and develop your students’ listening skill” guide.

Look down, write your email address, and then click “Subscribe”


Subscribe to our Blog  

 

Who Else Wants My eBook for the Lowest Price

My eBook: “Teaching Beginning Reading to ESL/EFL Learners”  is now on SALE for the lowest price for a limited time.

Why I wrote this eBook:

I wrote it simply because many ESL/EFL teachers asked for it. They told me that most of their students are challenged with learning to read in English and they are constantly searching for the suitable techniques that can help their young learners read quickly and easily in English. So, I’ve decided to write this eBook to exchange my experience with the teachers on the techniques they should use in the classroom, the guidelines they should follow and the reading tasks that can get most students to read in ESL/EFL classes with ease and in a fairly short time.

What the eBook includes:

  • What reading is.
  • Approaches to teaching beginning reading.
  • Stages of teaching beginning reading.
  • Sample activities for beginning reading.
  • Guideline before beginning to teach reading in ESL/EFL.

Why to sell it:

By selling this eBook, you will not only have control on teaching reading comprehension in the classroom but also you will support me with little money to continue my mission of helping ESL/EFL teachers teach English language more effectively.


Moreover, If you are interested in how to teach reading comprehension and want practical tips to do so in the classroom, you can buy my latest eBook: Teaching Reading Comprehension to ESL/EFL Learners: A Practical Classroom Guide With Sample Reading Lesson Plans. Although it costs little but it includes much benefit especially for ESL/EFL teachers who search for practical steps that engage their students in reading and produce positive results. The main ideas tackled in this eBook are:

  • The nature of reading comprehension.
  • What should be done before starting a reading lesson.
  • Reading comprehension strategies and activities.
  • How to work with a reading text.
  • How to plan a reading lesson (with a model reading lesson plan).
  • How to develop your students’ reading comprehension so as to be efficient & advanced.

By selling this eBook, you will not only have control on teaching reading comprehension in the classroom but also you will support me with little money to continue my mission of helping ESL/EFL teachers teach English language more effectively.

Buy This eBook

How You Can Motivate Your Students to Read in the Classroom

This post gives EFL teachers some tips on how to make the reading comprehension activity accessible and motivating for students, describing how to create the basic motivational conditions and generate the initial motivation for reading comprehension in the classroom.

Motivation is one of the key factors that provides the main incentive to learn a foreign language. Without sufficient motivation, students cannot achieve long-term goals even if they own the best of abilities. So, the role of teachers is not only teaching the curriculum, but also motivating their students.

For teaching reading, the mission of motivating students is a great challenge as they come with different emotional and psychological interests.  However, using authentic reading texts remains one way of motivating students and making the task of reading in a foreign language interesting for them.

Tips on creating the basic motivational conditions:

  • Create a pleasant and supportive learning environment. The friendly and supportive atmosphere will encourage students to develop their full potential and achieve required goals.
  • Set rules or a class contract between yourself and your class regarding behavior and norms which everyone agrees to.
  • Divide the class into groups depending on your knowledge about students’ interests, levels, skills and points of strength. Encourage peer support within these groups.

Tips on generating initial motivation & maintaining it:

  • Inform students of the reasons why they are being asked to read authentic texts and explain the benefits to them. E.g., exposure to real English, developing language awareness, promoting language competence, exposure to real-life vocabulary, developing knowledge of the culture of the target language and, overall, contributing to achieving long-term language learning goals. Tell students that they should enjoy while doing the reading activity.
  • Give a brief description of the reading text and try to make this description interesting and motivating.
  • Relate the reading task to students’ culture and general knowledge.
  • Give the needed information that help students’ understanding and learning of new vocabulary.
  • Make sure that the reading text is appropriate to students’ learning level. It is important as too low level of challenge can result in lack of interest, and too high level can lead to over-anxiety or stress. The word challenge here refers to the task which is not easy but that can be overcome by giving students needed support and encouragement.
  • Explain how to work with the reading text. E.g. There will be 2-minute-first-silent reading to do a pre-task, then there will be intensive reading for more details, etc.
  • Encourage students to think about their approaches to reading and how to build their confidence. All fears they may have about not understanding every word so you should emphasize that 100 percent comprehension is not necessary to understand the overall meaning. Encourage them to use all available and relevant clues from the language, the context and from the illustrations to help make sense of the reading text.
  • Train students on using reading comprehension strategies such as previewing, skimming and scanning, inferring meaning etc.
  • Provide a point of entry. This could be a scene from a story, an illustration or any paragraph can be looked at or read in class before starting the actual reading. This entry will help the reading material to be more accessible to students and sufficiently stimulating to arouse their interest in the setting, characters, and narration of the text It can provide a starting point and a future point of reference throughout the reading.
  • Provide a pre-reading task. This is before reading stage. E.g., previewing the title or the sub-headings. Pre-reading tasks can stimulate students’ interest, introduce characters and setting in a story, relate the text to what students already know, etc.
  • Inform students of the final goal of the reading activity, whether it is acting out a story, producing a poster, role-playing a dialogue, writing a summary or a letter, organizing a project, etc. Knowing that their work is leading towards something concrete and relevant can help students focus throughout the reading process.

If you want more practical tips to teach reading comprehension in the classroom, you can buy my latest eBook: Teaching Reading Comprehension to ESL/EFL Learners: A Practical Classroom Guide With Sample Reading Lesson Plans. Although it costs little but it includes much benefit especially for ESL/EFL teachers who search for practical steps that engage their students in reading and produce positive results. The main ideas tackled in this eBook are:

  • The nature of reading comprehension.
  • What should be done before starting a reading lesson.
  • Reading comprehension strategies and activities.
  • How to work with a reading text.
  • How to plan a reading lesson (with a model reading lesson plan).
  • How to develop your students’ reading comprehension so as to be efficient & advanced.

By selling this eBook, you will not only have control on teaching reading comprehension in the classroom but also you will support me with little money to continue my mission of helping ESL/EFL teachers teach English language more effectively.

Buy My eBook

7 Steps to Teach Reading, From Beginning to Reading Comprehension

Step 1: Teach the sounds of individual letters:

Students need to be taught the individual sounds in words and that words are made up of small parts of sound and phonemes. Recognizing individual sounds and understanding the relationship between letters and spoken sounds (phonics) create phonemic awareness.

Be sure to emphasize ending sounds as well as the more obvious beginning sounds. Listening for ending sounds is sometimes overlooked, yet it is very important.

Step 2: Teach sound blends:

Sound blends such as st, fl, dr, sh, etc should be emphasized on as well as digraphs such as ch, ck, ph. These letters together form distinct sounds or phonemes.

Step 3: Teach whole words:

Whole-word recognition or word identification is made up of being able to use sound-symbol relationships. This is an important skill that is worth the time spent to master. Word families- bat, cat, pat, sat, etc. are important in this stage. Vowels should require special attention in this stage, especially when distancing between short /i/ and short /e/ (As in /pit/ and /pet/) throughout the whole-word reading process.

We learn some sight words incidentally or in the course of everyday life. Certain words are just recognized by their appearance and EFL students can recognize and appear to “read” signs and advertisements, such as Brand Names such as NIKE, Pepsi, etc.

Here are some materials you can use to promote the developing EFL students’ identification of sight words:

  • Word games such as matching and word search games.
  • Flashcards or reader books with plenty of sight words.
  • Picture dictionaries.
  • Rhymes and entertaining poetry.

Step 4: Present meanings:

Be sure that students know the meaning of each word they read. You can use a lot of techniques to present the meanings such as drawings, pictures, miming, etc. Don’t forget to check the understanding of the meanings frequently. Be sure that students can discriminate the variations in meaning as well as go over words that sound the same but have different spellings and meanings.

Step 5: Teach word parts:

It is important to teach word parts: prefixes, root words, suffixes, and derivations of words. When students know these parts, they will be able to understand more words. For example, when an elementary school student knows the meaning of “bed” and the meaning of “room”, they will understand easily the meaning of “bedroom”.

Step 6: Put words in contexts:

Encouraging students to put each word in a context is a powerful strategy. The student who can use words in sentences can demonstrate a mastery of reading and language usage as well.

Step 7: Teach reading comprehension:

Teaching reading comprehension is essential to achieve the enjoyment of reading or reading for pleasure and for understanding informational text. Several important techniques to check reading comprehension can be use. You can ask students to:

  • retell, summarize, or paraphrase what is read.
  • make inferences or draw conclusions.
  • sequence events.
  • compare and contrast, etc.

P.S. If you liked this post, please share it with your friends using the buttons below, and if we are not connected on social media yet, you can find me on Facebook and Twitter.

You can also subscribe to our blog not only to get our latest posts delivered to your email box but also to get our FREE GIFT“How to teach and develop your students’ listening skill” guide.

Look down, write your email address, and then click “Subscribe”


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You can also get my eBook “Teaching Beginning Reading to ESL/EFL Learners” now for the lowest price for a limited time.

1-min Eltt guide – How Do You Teach Reading Comprehension?

1. Pre-reading I:

  • use brainstorming or spider maps,
  • read the title and subtitles for students,
  • encourage prediction and guessing.

2. First reading should be for gist (skimming):

Pupils read silently to answer a question that aims for the general theme of the text.

3. Second reading should be for details (scanning):

Pupils read again to remember details. I would allow pupils to read questions to realize for what purpose they are reading.

4. Post-reading I: 

  • discuss the text with students,
  • ask students to evaluate the text and give opinions.

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Do You Recognize The Two Keys to Teach Reading?

Reading is described by some people as the reconstruction and interpretation of meanings behind printed symbols. Others say it is the process of understanding written language. These explanations of reading are accurate. The main point is that comprehension of written material is the purpose of reading. In fact, we consider reading comprehension and reading to be synonymous because when understanding breaks down, reading has not occurred.

The two keys to teach your students how to read:

  1. Phonics.                       
  2. Phonemic awareness.

Phonics:

Phonics is one method of teaching children how to read. Children are taught how to “sound out” new words by learning the following items:

  • Consonant letters’ sounds: b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, l, m, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, w, x, y, z
  • Blend sounds: br, cr, dr, fr, gr, pr, tr, wr, bl, cl, fl, gl, pl, sl, scr, str, sm, sn,sp, sc, sk,
  • Short vowel sounds: a, e, i, o, u
  • Digraph sounds: sh, ch, th, wh
  • Double vowel sounds: ai, ea, ee, oa
  • Other double vowel sounds: oi, oo, ou, ow
  • Silent /e/
  • /R/ controlled vowel sounds: ar, er, ir, or, ur

Phonics is a series of rules that children must memorize and apply when they are sounding out new words. For example:

  • Children are taught a rule, i.e. silent /e/,
  • Next, they practice reading words with silent /e/.
  • Then, they do skill sheets at their desk highlighting the silent /e/ rule.

Children must learn letter sounds to an automatic level – they must be able to see the letter(s) and say the sound immediately.

Phonemic Awareness:

Phonemic awareness is the understanding that spoken words and syllables are themselves made up of sequences of elementary speech sounds. This understanding is essential for learning to read an alphabetic language because it is these elementary sounds or phonemes that letters represent. Without phonemic awareness, phonics can make no sense, and the spellings of words can be learned only by memorization.

Elements of phonemic awareness:

  • Rhyming: Children can recognize rhymes easily when they hear it.
  • Hearing syllables: Children can break up words into syllables.
  • Blending:  Children can blend phonemes to make words (c / a / t).
  • Segmentation:  Children hear and say the word sound by sound (ba/na/na).

P.S. For further reading on teaching your students how to read in English”, You can get my eBook “Teaching Beginning Reading to ESL/EFL Learners” now for the lowest price for a limited time.

It is a practical guide for EFL teachers to teaching beginning reading and getting their students to read in English with ease and as quickly as possible. This guide tackles the following main ideas:

* What is reading?

* The main approaches to teaching beginning reading.

* The stages of teaching beginning reading.

* Sample activities for beginning reading.

* Some important guidelines for teachers to follow before beginning to teach reading in English.

Strategies to Achieve Reading Comprehension and Ways to Help Students Apply Them

Reading is an interactive process that goes on between the reader and the text, resulting in comprehension. The text presents letters, words, sentences, and paragraphs that encode meaning. The reader uses knowledge, skills, and strategies to determine what that meaning is.

The purpose(s) for reading and the type of text determine the specific knowledge, skills, and strategies that readers need to apply to achieve comprehension. Reading comprehension is thus much more than decoding. Reading comprehension results when the reader knows which skills and strategies are appropriate for the type of text and understands how to apply them to accomplish the reading purpose.

Reading research shows that good readers:

  • Are motivated and interested in what they read.
  • Read extensively.
  • Integrate information in the text with existing knowledge.
  • Have a flexible reading style, depending on what they are reading.
  • Use different skills when they read: interacting, perceptual processing, phonemic processing, recall, etc.
  • Read for a purpose; reading serves a function for them.

Readers need to develop the following competences during their reading sessions:

  1. Linguistic competence: The ability to recognize the elements of the writing system.
  2. Knowledge of vocabulary: Knowledge of how words are structured into sentences.
  3. Discourse competence: Knowledge of discourse markers and how they connect parts of the text to one another
  4. Sociolinguistic competence: Knowledge about different types of texts and their usual structure and content.
  5. Strategic competence: The ability to use top-down strategies as well as knowledge of the language (a bottom-up strategy)

Most students seem to think that reading means starting at the beginning and going word by word, stopping to look up every unknown vocabulary item, until they reach the end. When they do this, they are relying only on their linguistic knowledge, a bottom-up strategy. The role of the language teacher comes here to help students move past this idea and use top-down strategies as well as bottom-up ones.

Effective language teachers show students how they can adjust their reading behavior to deal with a variety of situations, types of input, and reading purposes. They help students develop a set of reading strategies and match appropriate strategies to each reading situation.

Strategies that can help students read more quickly and effectively include:

1. Previewing:

Reviewing titles, section headings, and photo captions to get a sense of the structure and content of a reading passage.

2. Predicting:

Using knowledge of the subject matter to make predictions about content and vocabulary and check comprehension; using knowledge of the text type and purpose to make predictions about discourse structure; using knowledge about the author to make predictions about writing style, vocabulary, and content.

3. Skimming and scanning:

Using a quick survey of the text to get the main idea, identify text structure, confirm or reject predictions. Then, reading carefully for more detailed information.

4. Guessing meanings from context:

Using prior knowledge of the subject and the ideas in the text as clues to the meanings of unknown words, instead of stopping to look them up.

5. Paraphrasing:

Stopping at the end of a section to check comprehension by restating the information and ideas in the text.

Language teachers can help students apply these reading strategies in several ways, by:

  • Modeling these strategies aloud:

Talking through the processes of previewing, predicting, skimming and scanning, and paraphrasing. This shows students how the strategies work and how much they can know about a text before they begin to read word by word.

  • Allocating time in class for activities to develop these strategies:

Allowing time in class for group and individual previewing and predicting activities as preparation for in-class or out-of-class reading. Allocating class time to these activities indicates their importance and value.

  • Using cloze (fill in the blank) exercises:

Use this kind of exercises to review vocabulary items. This helps students learn to guess meaning from context.

  • Asking about the suitable strategies to use:

Encouraging students to talk about what strategies they think will help them approach a reading assignment, and then talking after reading about what strategies they actually used. This helps students develop flexibility in their choice of strategies.

When students use reading strategies, they find that they can control the reading experience, gain confidence in their ability to read the language and achieve the ultimate goal which is reading comprehension.


P.S. If you liked this post, please share it with your friends using the buttons below, and if we are not connected on social media yet, you can find me on Facebook and Twitter.

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How to Read Aloud to Your Students

The reading aloud moments should be a special time when students feel comfortable sitting and listening with enjoyment. The content should be of high interest and valuable to students. The reading passage should not be too long, otherwise students’ attention will wander. In fact, the teacher needs to plan the read-aloud lesson to eliminate any problem and achieve the objectives desired.

Pre-reading activities and discussion:

  • Preview the reading text before the read-aloud and decide which vocabulary the students should understand, and you must pre-teach.
  • If there are some illustrations accompanying the text, ask students to look at them telling you what they see.
  • Write the key vocabulary on the board and present their meanings using the illustrations in the coursebook or your own drawings.
  • Ask simple questions to activate what the students already know about the topic of the reading text.

Reading the text aloud:

The first reading is usually carried out by the teacher or by a tape-recorder in order to encourage normal oral reading. The teacher reads aloud while the students listen carefully. While reading, remember to:

  • Pay-attention to correct pausing, whether indicated by punctuation or not.
  • Read in complete phrases (not word by word).
  • Adopt an appropriate speed and rhythm.
  • Don’t distort pitch, stress and intonation.
  • Read in a relaxed manner that is close to a native speaker’s natural speech.
  • During the reading, try to keep eye contact with as many of your students as you can. Eye contact will not only give you useful information about the students’ attention level, but it will also help engage the students in the text.
  • Pause during the story and point to an illustration in the coursebook to help students understand a key word or point to the pictures you drew on the board to preview the main idea of the text.
  • Use facial gestures and body gestures to indicate the meaning of the words.
  • Pose questions throughout the reading that enhance meaning construction and also show how readers can make sense of the text.

After-reading activities:

After-reading activities create opportunities for students to connect the reading materials to their personal lives, and help the teacher to explore the connections that the students have made. Some of these activities are as follows:

  • Comprehension questions:

Ask the students one or two wh-comprehension questions, the answers to which can be taken directly from the text. Relevant question and answer practice will add variety to your reading session. Fill-in-the-gaps, true-false, correct-the-mistake questions are more questions that can be used by the teacher to check comprehension and promote understanding of the reading text.

  • Student read-aloud:

Ask individual students or groups of students to read aloud the paragraphs of the reading text, one by another. Rotate the roles so that all have a chance to read a part. Encourage students to stick to stress and intonation during these readings to develop their speaking skills.

  • Summarize the text:

After reading, ask students to give you the main ideas included in the text. You can invite a brilliant student to summarize the main points in the text in front of the class.

  • Use the pictures:

You can use the illustrations in the coursebook or the drawings you created on the board and encourage students to talk about them using the information they listened to during the reading-aloud session.

  • Write one or two paragraphs:

Removing the coursebook, ask students to work in groups and write a paragraph on the reading-aloud topic tackling the main points or just writing what they can remember. Then, ask one student from each group to read aloud what they have written.


P.S. If you liked this post, please share it with your friends using the buttons below, and if we are not connected on social media yet, you can find me on Facebook and Twitter.

You can also subscribe to our blog not only to get our latest posts delivered to your email box but also to get our FREE GIFT“How to teach and develop your students’ listening skill” guide.

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