Category: Lesson Planning

9 Best Ways to Finish EFL Lessons

It is as important to end an EFL lesson effectively as you start it. Your main aim is that your students leave the classroom with good feeling about themselves and their learning. They should end their EFL lesson with a sense of achievement and the knowledge that they have made progress in their English.

The following are nine of the best ways that you can use and adapt to end your EFL classes.

1. Giving feedback.

After presenting the new language, students should have some time to practise the language presented. Students do practice by working on certain tasks. Towards the end of the lesson, students need to be given feedback about their work. For example, if they have been involved in a writing task, you can note the common mistakes they did in their writing, then spend the last ten minutes of the lesson talking about the things you noted. Praise correct and creative ideas, sentences and expressions, and discuss the common mistakes done eliciting from students how to correct them and improve any piece of writing. This approach to ending your EFL lesson offers a nice closure. In addition, it supports students’ recognition of their progress and what they still need to work on.

2. Displaying work.

If your students have spent a lot of time in the lesson working on something creative such as writing a story or designing a poster, make sure you allow time at the end of class for them to display their work. For example, they could pin it up on the walls and then walk around the classroom looking at each other’s work. You can select some students to describe what they have done or give a title to their work. This is a very satisfying way to end a lesson. You might need 15 minutes for it. If you feel you don’t have enough time to dedicate to this type of display, then consider setting up a class blog where students can post their work online.

3. Asking “What have you learnt today?”

Set aside five minutes at the end of the lesson for the students to reflect on what they have studied in the lesson. Ask them to write down three new things that they learnt in today’s lesson and to compare their list with other students. This is a quick way to establish what everyone is taking away from the lesson.

4. Defining what you can do.

You might have a course syllabus or course materials include ‘can do’ statements at the end of each page or lesson for students to review their learning. For example, the student can define a language objective with a statement like ‘I can order food in a restaurant’. You can write on the board at the end of the lesson “I can ……. “ and encourage students to complete with what they can already do in English as a result of the lesson.

5. Revising vocabulary from the lesson.

It’s good to have the last 10 minutes of the lesson to revise some of the vocabulary that has been taught. You could choose 10 new words from the lesson and have a quiz in which students compete in groups. Read out a definition of the word and they have to say what it is.

6. Ending with “Challenge yourself”.

You could spend the final 10 minutes doing a high-level exercise or having general language knowledge quiz on grammar or vocabulary. This ending can engage brilliant students and challenge them. It will also change the pace and end the lesson on a high note.

7. Asking “Any questions?”

Allow time at the end for students to ask questions. Questions allowed at the end could be questions about the subject-matter of the lesson or they might be about the course in general. If one student has a question, it’s good for the whole class to know the answer to it so that benefit will spread.

8. Setting homework

It’s usually best to set homework towards the end of a lesson and to make sure – especially in the case of younger learners and teens – that all students write it down somewhere. Even if you set the homework earlier in the lesson, remind your students about it again at the end.

9. Previewing the next lesson.

It’s preferable especially for good students to give a short description about the next lesson in advance. Try to be focused and add some kind of excitement to your talk about the next subject. You may ask students to prepare the lesson, telling them what to do exactly to be more knowledgeable about the next class.

Can you add way # 10 to the list? Let us read about it in your comment.


Thanks For Reading.

Enjoyed this post? Share it with your networks using the social media buttons below.


More Useful TEFL Resources You Can Get

If you are interested in how to teach reading comprehension and want practical tips to do so in the classroom, you can buy my latest eBook: Teaching Reading Comprehension to ESL/EFL Learners: A Practical Classroom Guide With Sample Reading Lesson Plans.

Buy This eBook


If you want to know how to teach beginning reading to your primary students, you can get my featured eBook “Teaching Beginning Reading to ESL/EFL Learners”.

Buy This eBook


Coming Soon

A new eBook on “Teaching the Writing Process to ESL/EFL Learners.” Subscribe to my blog to know more about it and be informed with its release time.


Call to Subscribe to My Blog.

You may also like to subscribe to my blog not only to be notified of my latest posts and publications but also to get my FREE GIFTS: Two of My Featured ELT Guides.

Look down, write your email address, and then click “Subscribe”


Subscribe to our Blog  

 

13 EFL Quickie Warmers to Start Your Class

A warmer is a motivating starting activity better called: zealous, suggestive, dynamic and enthusiastic. It is an activity done at the beginning of the lesson to activate students to become animated in the language class. It is considered as a tool designed to attract students’ attention.

Advantages of warmers.

For teachers, warmers enable them to:

  • get students’ attention and make them engaged in the following steps.
  • break the monotony of learning.
  • make the tasks more interesting.
  • move students smoothly to the target language.
  • activate the students’ background knowledge.
  • help put aside distracting thoughts.
  • serve as a springboard into the topic or target language.
  • ensure students’ involvement in the class.
  • recognize the different types of students’ learning styles.

For students, warmers enable them to:

  • get their minds focused on the lesson ahead.
  • get them started, so the wheels in their heads can start turning,
  • have fun and enjoyment at the beginning of the lesson.
  • know each other.
  • open up their creative thinking to apply learning in new ways.
  • feel comfortable with the environment and their classmates.
  • increase their participation.
  • review vocabulary from a previous class.
  • have their energy raised.
  • think and speak in English.

Tips to manage a warm-up activity:

  • Normally, the warm-up session is the first 5 minutes of the class.
  • During this session, get students to relax, know each other, and chat with their peers and with the teacher.
  • There should be a good kind of mobilization.
  • During the warm-up session, you should not over-correct students’ mistakes.
  • Plan well for the warm-up session in a way that facilitates the rest of the lesson, increases students’ confidence and avoid students’ feeling of worry that prevents them from saying or doing what you want.
  • Control the tone of what is to take place during this session.

13 examples of EFL warm-up activities to start your class right off.

1. Vocabulary Circle:

Teacher asks random students for a verb, a noun, an adjective or an adverb that begins with a, b, c, d, etc.

2. Catch Up:

Students interview other students in pairs or groups to discover about their lives: past, present and future.

3. Finish the Thought:

Teacher writes the beginning of a sentence on the board. Students are asked to complete it.

E.g. Today, I’m happy about ……………

Today will be awesome because ……………

Yesterday, I wish I had …………….

4. I Went to the Market:

This circle game begins with the simple statement:

(I went to the market and bought a ……….)

The first student adds a noun (a bag of flour).

The second student reads and adds (a packet of tea)

The third student reads and adds (a kilo of sugar), and so on.

By the end of the circle, the student will be required to have memorized a dozen of nouns and measure expressions.

5. What Does Your Name Mean?

Using a dictionary, google, a mobile or any other resource, students find and write down an appropriate adjective that begins with each letter of their first name. for example:

Hany: honest, active, neat, youthful.

6. Mixed-up Sentence:

Teacher writes a sentence on the board but mixes up the word order; then challenges students to reconstruct the original sentence.

7. The A to Z Game:

Teacher gives students a theme, for example: jobs, food, etc. teacher writes the letters a to z on the board. Teams of students must race to write an appropriate word next to each letter on the board.

8. Name Ten:

Teacher has students think of 10 items that fit particular criteria like:

Jobs where people have to wear a uniform, sports played with a ball, animals that lay eggs, three-letter parts of the body … etc.

9. Word Chain:

Students toss a ball to each other – and name the words that start with the last letter of the previous word, forming the chain. for example: ball, lamp, pen, and so on.

10. Error Correction Races:

Teacher puts students in some teams – and gives them lists of sentences containing mistakes. Students race to see which team can correct the entire page first. Teacher can include some correct sentences as well as sentences with multiple mistakes.

11. Synonyms & Antonyms:

Students work in pairs. Teacher gives students a word (good, for example). Students have to think of synonyms and antonyms. The pair of students that think of the most words win.

12. Can’t Say: “Yes or No”:

Here, students ask each other questions to try to get the other members of their group to say, “Yes or No”. The other members must answer the questions, but without saying “Yes or No”. It’s a fun activity that requires students to think on their feet.

13. Here’s the Answer; What’s the Question:

Teacher writes the answers to a few questions – about his life – on the board. Students have to guess what the corresponding questions are:

Examples:

Two.

Hamburger.

In the club.

Do you have any more warmers? Let us know in your comment.


Thanks For Reading.

Enjoyed this post? Share it with your networks using the social media buttons below.


More Useful TEFL Resources You Can Get

If you are interested in how to teach reading comprehension and want practical tips to do so in the classroom, you can buy my latest eBook: Teaching Reading Comprehension to ESL/EFL Learners: A Practical Classroom Guide With Sample Reading Lesson Plans.

Buy This eBook


If you want to know how to teach beginning reading to your primary students, you can get my featured eBook “Teaching Beginning Reading to ESL/EFL Learners”.

Buy This eBook


Call to Subscribe to My Blog.

You may also like to subscribe to my blog not only to be notified of my latest posts and publications but also to get my FREE GIFTS: Two of My Featured ELT Guides.

Look down, write your email address, and then click “Subscribe”


Subscribe to our Blog  

 

Do You Know What ECRIF is?!

ECRIF stands for five phases of students’ learning: Encounter, Clarify, Remember, Internalize, Fluency.

ECRIF is a framework for understanding learning, looking at how people learn rather than prescribing what teachers should or should not do.

ECRIF framework focuses on the learning process that students go through as they work with the target skill or knowledge rather than what the teacher is doing during the lesson.

This framework can provide a tool that help teachers see student activities and content from the perspective of student learning. In this way, ECRIF is connected to how teachers think about what is happening in their classrooms.

Who developed ECRIF and where is it being used?

ECRIF framework was developed by Josh Kurzweil and Mary Scholl between 2004 and 2005 as they wrote the book Understanding Teaching Through Learning

This framework has been used in a variety of workshops given for governmental and non-governmental organizations. Although it was originally developed for English language teachers, it has also been with content teachers teaching other subjects such as history and math as well as vocational instruction such as using computer software and operating construction equipment.

Benefits of recognizing the ECRIF framework.

ECRIF can be used by the teachers to:

  • plan lessons and adapt course book materials = (reflecting for action).
  • assess where students are in their learning process during a lesson = (reflecting in action).
  • reflect on student learning after a lesson = (reflecting on action).
  • determine what kind of corrective feedback would be useful for the learner.

The phases of ECRIF framework.

ENCOUNTER.

The encounter phase of learning is the first time a learner encounters new material or information.  It is the presentation of new language.  In the ENCOUNTER phase, the learner’s background knowledge is activated and what they already know is found out.

Methods of ENCOUNTER:

  • Inductive or deductive presentation.
  • Storytelling with or without realia, role play, pictures, recordings, etc.
  • Matching exercises
  • Categorizing, sorting, predicting

CLARIFY:

Clarify is something that happens inside the learner when the learner can determine, for example, certain meaning or pronunciation of a vocabulary word or use certain grammar construction in certain situation.  Teachers of course assist in clarifying and check or assess learners’ understanding of material.  One way that teachers check comprehension is with comprehension checking questions.

4 kinds of comprehension checking questions.

  1. Non-verbal affirmation – “Point to the supermarket.”
  2. Positive/negative – “Is this a supermarket?”  “Can I buy bread at the supermarket?”
  3. Discrimination – “If I want to buy bread, do I go to the pharmacy or the supermarket?”
  4. Short answer – “What is the name of a local supermarket?”

Some notes about comprehension checking questions (CCQs): 

They are used to check the understanding of anything that learners have encountered or been presented:  vocabulary, grammar, appropriateness, etc.  They are also to check if students understand instructions for an activity, project, or assignment. It is helpful to write them out at first in your lesson plan.

REMEMBER:

This is the first step in putting new material in memory.  It is usually characterized by repetition, drilling, and referring back to support materials using models or prompts.

Typical activities for remembering:

  • Drilling.
  • Gap filling or cloze test.
  • Information gap.
  • Searches.
  • Scrambled words or sentences.
  • Guessing games.
  • Matching.
  • Reading scripts and dialogues.

Note about remembering: 

The activities for this stage of learning are also called “controlled practice”.  Controlled practice means that the learner has lots of support, and little or no choice in how to successfully complete the activity or exercise.

INTERNALIZE:

When a learner internalizes material, it is transferred to long-term memory. Continued practice is needed to help internalize new language or information. Kinds of practice here differs from the remembering stage in that it will be freer and less controlled. In this stage learners make more choices in how they are using the information and relying less on outside support.

Typical activities for internalization:

  • Guessing games.
  • Information gaps.
  • Storytelling/role play.
  • Short answers.

Notes about activities to remember and internalize:   

Learners go through a process of putting target language into short-term memory and then longer-term memory in order to prepare for later communication by practicing the language in various ways moving from “teacher-controlled” to “learner-initiated” activities.

FLUENCY:

In this stage of learning, learners are using new material and information fluidly, in accordance with their current understanding and internalized grasp of the material.  It is the stage where they freely test internalized knowledge and spontaneously produce the target language creatively in a personal, real-life communication tasks.

Typical fluency activities:

  • Guessing games.
  • Fluency lines, circles.
  • Debates.
  • Role play.
  • Information gap.
  • Discussions.

Note: While corrective feedback is useful at the practice stages of language learning, no corrective feedback is offered during fluency activities, because it interrupts the flow of language production.

Remember: ECRIF is not a linear framework. Learners find themselves practicing fluency before they have internalized target language. They go back to clarify something that is not fully understood, then double back to drill or practice fluency. After learners have internalized the meaning of a structure, they encounter a new meaning or use of the same structure which again leads them to clarify, remember, etc.

Since ECRIF is not linear, the teacher orders the stages of the lesson based upon student learning and chooses to start lessons with fluency practice, or returns to pronunciation drilling based upon the assessment of learner production in the internalization or fluency stage of the lesson.


If you have any more ideas, experiences, questions, or feedback related to the ECRIF framework, please, share them with me. You can email me at eltguide@gmail.com


You may also like to subscribe to my blog not only to be notified of my latest posts and publications but also to get my FREE GIFTS: Two of My Featured ELT Guides.

Look down, write your email address, and then click “Subscribe”


Subscribe to our Blog  

 

English Language Teaching & Testing Guide © 2018 Frontier Theme