Tag: teach reading

Who Else Wants My eBook for FREE Before 25 Jan. 2019

I’ve written this post to announce to all my readers and followers that I’m going to launch my eBook: “Teaching Beginning Reading to ESL/EFL Learners” for low price on 25 Jan. 2019.

Why I wrote this eBook:

I wrote it simply because many ESL/EFL teachers asked for it. They told me that most of their students are challenged with learning to read in English and they are constantly searching for the suitable techniques that can help their young learners read quickly and easily in English. So, I’ve decided to write this eBook to exchange my experience with the teachers on the techniques they should use in the classroom, the guidelines they should follow and the reading tasks that can get most students to read in ESL/EFL classes with ease and in a fairly short time.

What the eBook includes:

  • What reading is.
  • Approaches to teaching beginning reading.
  • Stages of teaching beginning reading.
  • Sample activities for beginning reading.
  • Guideline before beginning to teach reading in ESL/EFL.

How to get the eBook for FREE (Before 25 Jan. 2019):

Now, you still have the opportunity to get this eBook for FREE if you click on the link of the book before the starting of 25 Jan. 2019 (Cairo Time). By clicking on the link, you will subscribe to my blog and you will not only receive a link to your FREE copy of the book, but also you will be informed with updates on my blog regularly.

Why not to keep it FREE:

On 25 Jan. 2019, I’m going to sell this eBook to get some money to support and help me continue my mission of helping ESL/EFL teachers teach English language more effectively. I’m going to keep it low priced so that many teachers can afford it.

Get This eBook for FREE Now


Moreover, If you are interested in how to teach reading comprehension and want practical tips to do so in the classroom, you can buy my latest eBook: Teaching Reading Comprehension to ESL/EFL Learners: A Practical Classroom Guide With Sample Reading Lesson Plans. Although it costs little but it includes much benefit especially for ESL/EFL teachers who search for practical steps that engage their students in reading and produce positive results. The main ideas tackled in this eBook are:

  • The nature of reading comprehension.
  • What should be done before starting a reading lesson.
  • Reading comprehension strategies and activities.
  • How to work with a reading text.
  • How to plan a reading lesson (with a model reading lesson plan).
  • How to develop your students’ reading comprehension so as to be efficient & advanced.

By selling this eBook, you will not only have control on teaching reading comprehension in the classroom but also you will support me with little money to continue my mission of helping ESL/EFL teachers teach English language more effectively.

Buy This eBook

How You Can Motivate Your Students to Read in the Classroom

This post gives EFL teachers some tips on how to make the reading comprehension activity accessible and motivating for students, describing how to create the basic motivational conditions and generate the initial motivation for reading comprehension in the classroom.

Motivation is one of the key factors that provides the main incentive to learn a foreign language. Without sufficient motivation, students cannot achieve long-term goals even if they own the best of abilities. So, the role of teachers is not only teaching the curriculum, but also motivating their students.

For teaching reading, the mission of motivating students is a great challenge as they come with different emotional and psychological interests.  However, using authentic reading texts remains one way of motivating students and making the task of reading in a foreign language interesting for them.

Tips on creating the basic motivational conditions:

  • Create a pleasant and supportive learning environment. The friendly and supportive atmosphere will encourage students to develop their full potential and achieve required goals.
  • Set rules or a class contract between yourself and your class regarding behavior and norms which everyone agrees to.
  • Divide the class into groups depending on your knowledge about students’ interests, levels, skills and points of strength. Encourage peer support within these groups.

Tips on generating initial motivation & maintaining it:

  • Inform students of the reasons why they are being asked to read authentic texts and explain the benefits to them. E.g., exposure to real English, developing language awareness, promoting language competence, exposure to real-life vocabulary, developing knowledge of the culture of the target language and, overall, contributing to achieving long-term language learning goals. Tell students that they should enjoy while doing the reading activity.
  • Give a brief description of the reading text and try to make this description interesting and motivating.
  • Relate the reading task to students’ culture and general knowledge.
  • Give the needed information that help students’ understanding and learning of new vocabulary.
  • Make sure that the reading text is appropriate to students’ learning level. It is important as too low level of challenge can result in lack of interest, and too high level can lead to over-anxiety or stress. The word challenge here refers to the task which is not easy but that can be overcome by giving students needed support and encouragement.
  • Explain how to work with the reading text. E.g. There will be 2-minute-first-silent reading to do a pre-task, then there will be intensive reading for more details, etc.
  • Encourage students to think about their approaches to reading and how to build their confidence. All fears they may have about not understanding every word so you should emphasize that 100 percent comprehension is not necessary to understand the overall meaning. Encourage them to use all available and relevant clues from the language, the context and from the illustrations to help make sense of the reading text.
  • Train students on using reading comprehension strategies such as previewing, skimming and scanning, inferring meaning etc.
  • Provide a point of entry. This could be a scene from a story, an illustration or any paragraph can be looked at or read in class before starting the actual reading. This entry will help the reading material to be more accessible to students and sufficiently stimulating to arouse their interest in the setting, characters, and narration of the text It can provide a starting point and a future point of reference throughout the reading.
  • Provide a pre-reading task. This is before reading stage. E.g., previewing the title or the sub-headings. Pre-reading tasks can stimulate students’ interest, introduce characters and setting in a story, relate the text to what students already know, etc.
  • Inform students of the final goal of the reading activity, whether it is acting out a story, producing a poster, role-playing a dialogue, writing a summary or a letter, organizing a project, etc. Knowing that their work is leading towards something concrete and relevant can help students focus throughout the reading process.

If you want more practical tips to teach reading comprehension in the classroom, you can buy my latest eBook: Teaching Reading Comprehension to ESL/EFL Learners: A Practical Classroom Guide With Sample Reading Lesson Plans. Although it costs little but it includes much benefit especially for ESL/EFL teachers who search for practical steps that engage their students in reading and produce positive results. The main ideas tackled in this eBook are:

  • The nature of reading comprehension.
  • What should be done before starting a reading lesson.
  • Reading comprehension strategies and activities.
  • How to work with a reading text.
  • How to plan a reading lesson (with a model reading lesson plan).
  • How to develop your students’ reading comprehension so as to be efficient & advanced.

By selling this eBook, you will not only have control on teaching reading comprehension in the classroom but also you will support me with little money to continue my mission of helping ESL/EFL teachers teach English language more effectively.

Buy My eBook

FREE eBook Tells You How to Teach Beginning Reading in English

Students who fail at reading in English are unlikely to do well in English exams at school, so all EFL teachers in primary schools place much emphasis on developing the reading skills of their learners.

EFL teachers in primary schools are constantly searching for effective techniques that can help them produce effective results related to getting their students to read in English as quickly as possible, that’s why I’ve decided to create this eBook.

It is a practical guide for EFL teachers to teaching beginning reading and getting their students to read in English easily and quickly.

The eBook tackles the following main ideas:

  • What is reading?
  • The main approaches to teaching beginning reading.
  • The stages of teaching beginning reading.
  • Sample activities for beginning reading.
  • Some important guidelines for EFL teachers to follow before beginning to teach reading in English.

This eBook is now available for FREE for a limited time. You just need to tell me your name, country and where to send it to you. A link to the eBook will be sent straight to your email box for FREE and I promise to keep your email address private.

I offer this free step-by-step eBook guide not only for EFL teachers but also for parents to help them get their children to read in English easily and in a short time.

Moreover, if you get your free copy and read it, you will come across with another free download on teaching EFL grammar in the classroom as another gift from elttguide.com publications.

Right now, I want you to click the button below to get started filling in the form to receive a link to “Teaching Beginning Reading in English” eBook for FREE.

With my love and appreciation
Mohamed Ramadan
Author & Teacher Trainer

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1-min Eltt guide – How Would You Teach a Reading Text About a Famous Person?

At the end of this lesson, students would learn about this person and write one paragraph about his or her life.

I would plan this lesson in the following steps:

1. First, I should create interest among students by asking them:

  • Do you know (the name of the famous person)?
  • What do you know about him or her?
  • What would you like to know about him/her?

2. Next, I would allow students to quickly read the text to see if it answered any of the previous questions.

3. Then, I would pre-teach potentially problematic vocabulary and phrases and give any possible practice exercises on them to check and reinforce their understanding and pronunciation.

4. After that, I ask students to read the text again for detailed information, and then I would give them some comprehension task such as:

  • Wh-questions.
  • True/false questions.
  • Fill-in-the-spaces questions.

5. At the end, I would ask students to write a paragraph about this famous person and for homework I would ask them to write a paragraph about another famous person they are interested in and know information about him/her.


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A Lesson Plan to Teach the English Novel

Objectives:

By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Read for fun skimming and guessing the meaning of difficult words.
  2. Read for scanning and answer some questions on details of the chapter.
  3. Answer the questions on the chapter on the textbook.
  4. Act the scenes included in the chapter.

Teaching aids:

Set-book, Class board, mind mapping, video film, …….. etc.

Learning strategies

Individual, pair and group work, Playing roles, Analysis, Summarizing, …

Warm up (Reviewing):

* Ask about the author and characters of the novel, and the location(s) where the events happened.

* Remind students with the main events of the previous chapter.

* Ask some questions on the main events of the previous chapter.

Presentation (Viewing):

* Target Vocabulary:

* Target Structure:

* Target Function:

Steps of Introducing the New chapter:

  1. 1. Before reading, ask students to guess (expect) what events are going to happen.
  2. Write one or two questions on the board on the main points of the chapter at hand and ask students to read silently and quickly the chapter to answer these questions and underline any difficult words.
  3. After answering the pre-questions on the board, give students a general idea of the chapter , presenting the new vocabulary through using synonyms, antonyms, mind mapping, full sentences, real situations and deal with target structures and functions if found.

Practice:

  1. Write more questions (different types) on the board on details or ask students to read the questions on the chapter on the textbook. Then ask students to read again the chapter but carefully this time to answer the questions they’ve read. Students can work in pairs to answer the questions.
  2. Elicit the answers from students.
  3. Show students the scenes of the chapter on a video film (if found).
  4. Divide students into groups and distribute the roles among them to present the scenes of the chapter.
  5. At the end, some students come to the front and present a summary for the whole chapter using, First, Secondly, Next, Then, Later, Finally, ……

Assessment:

* Ask: What have we learned today?

* Ask some questions to elicit the main events.

* Ask students to write a summary for the chapter as a homework assignment.

* Assign some more questions on the chapter for students to answer in writing at home.

* Ask some critical thinking questions on the chapter.

Previewing:

* Specify the next part (chapter) of the novel for students to read.

* Write one or two pre-questions (different types) on the next part or chapter and ask students to answer them after reading at home.

Self-Evaluation:

* Students enjoyed reading for fun, skimming and scanning. Or

* Techniques used were suitable and objectives were achieved. Or

* Students need revision and more practice on the chapter at hand.

Teaching Reading Comprehension

The importance of teaching reading:

Teaching reading in the English language course should include the following set of learning goals:

1- enable students to read a wide range of texts in English.

2- develop awareness of the structures of the written English texts.

3- develop the ability of criticizing the content of texts.

4- practice different types of reading according to the purpose of reading.

5- exposing students to different types of texts to build solid knowledge of the language and to facilitate reading in the future.

Four types of reading:

1- Skimming: reading for the gist or the main idea of the text.

2- Scanning: reading to find specific information.

3- Extensive reading: reading for pleasure and general understanding.

4- Intensive reading: reading for getting the details.

A good reader:

Reading research shows that a good reader should:

1- be able to read extensively as well as intensively.

2- integrate information in the text with existing knowledge.

3- be able to use the two models of reading in processing a text.

4- be able to skim or scan a text depending on what he reads and the purpose of reading.

5- read for a purpose. His reading serves a function.

Why a person reads? A person may read in order to:

1- gain information.

2- verify existing knowledge.

3- criticize the writer’s ideas or the writing style.

4- enjoy oneself.

5- get specific information.

Three models of reading:

1- A bottom-up model: it emphasizes part-to-whole processing of a text. According to this model the readers should:

* identify sounds.

* recognize letters.

* link sounds.

* combine letters to recognize spelling patterns.

* link spelling patterns to recognize words.

Then proceed to sentence, paragraph and text-level processing.

2- A top-down model: it suggests that processing of a text begins in the mind of the reader by driving the meaning. According to this model the readers should:

* comprehend the text even though they don’t recognize each word.

* read primarily for meaning rather than mastery of letters, letter/sound relationships or words.

* use the whole meaning and the grammatical cues to identify unrecognized words.

* use meaning activities rather than a series of word recognition skills.

* read sentences, paragraphs and whole texts.

* gain the most amount of information through reading.

3- An interactive model: this model emphasizes the interaction of bottom-up and top-down process simultaneously through the reading process.

Three stages for teaching reading comprehension:

1- Stage One: Before reading ( pre-reading ):

* establish a purpose for reading ( e.g. answer a pre-question )

* activate prior knowledge.

* present new concepts and key vocabulary.

* ask students what information they predict to be included in the text.

* preview the text.

2- Stage Two: During reading:

* students read, comprehend, clarify,  visualize and build connections.

* students integrate the knowledge and information they bring to the text with new information in the text.

* pay attention to the structure of the text.

* read to achieve the purpose for reading.

* think about answers for certain questions.

* determine the meaning of unfamiliar words and concepts.

3- Stage Three: After reading ( post reading ):

* students expand prior knowledge, build connections and deepen understanding.

* students show their understanding of what they have read by answering some comprehension questions.

* evaluate the value and quality of the text.

* respond to the text by discussing its main ideas.

A helpful guide for types of questions to be asked before and after reading:

Bloom’s Taxonomy: reading activities and questions should take into account the six-level hierarchy of skills that Bloom suggested in his taxonomy. They are as follows:

1- Knowledge: includes recall or recognition of information.

2- Comprehension: includes explain, describe or rephrase the text.

3- Application: apply the information learned in the text.

4- Analysis: make inferences or derive generalizations.

5- Synthesis: combine several ideas.

6- Evaluation: judge the value or importance of the text.

13 steps to teach the short story

1- Introduce the title and the author. 

2- Introduce the characters and the names of places.

3- Point out the glossary and how it is organized & how to use it.

4- Assign pages for quick, silent reading at home.

5- Start the reading lesson by asking pupils to look at pictures in these pages & asking some warm up questions.

6- Present the meanings of the key words in these pages.

7- Put one or more Pre-question for each page.

8- Ask pupils to read without knowing every word to answer the pre-question.  

9- Discuss the answers with pupils

10- Put more questions about details & ask pupils to read again to answer

11- Discuss the answers

12- Ask pupils about what they expect may happen next.

13- Give three questions to be answered at home to encourage pupils to read the next assigned part. 

About Questions

1- Tackle the same types and number included in the specifications of the exam.

2- Ask most questions orally; write only 2 or 3 on the board of the most importance.

3- Give 3 questions to be answered at home on what have been read and on the next assigned part of reading.

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